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Nyack College Arts and Sciences News

Dr, Yu Honored by Wheaton's Institute of American Evangelicals

Posted by Fernando.Arzola on Saturday July 12, 2014

Dr. Keyone Kale Yu, Assistant Professor of History, was honored by Wheaton College’s Institute for the Study of American Evangelicals. He was selected as one of the winners of the “Diversity in American Evangelicalism” research travel grants. Dr. Yu was recognized for his work on Korean immigrant congregations in the New York City area.

For more information on the ISAE: http://www.wheaton.edu/isae

Nyack to Partner with Yale's Center for Scientific Teaching

Posted by Fernando.Arzola on Tuesday July 8, 2014

Nyack College has been selected as a Partner Instructor School to join The Center for Scientific Teaching at Yale University’s Small World Initiative: Crowdsourcing the Discovery of Antibiotics.  Numerous experts have recommended that all undergraduate students should be introduced to authentic scientific research at the introductory level, regardless of their major by replacing traditional cookbook labs with lab discovery research courses.  Research has shown that students benefit greatly as discovery-based instruction engages students, allows them to have ownership, stimulates their curiosity, and promotes deep, long lasting learning.

This project exposes students to a very serious and looming worldwide antibiotic crisis – most pharmaceutical companies have moved away from the development of new antibiotics to the pursuit of more lucrative drugs and the majority of the antibiotics that are now available are ineffective due to antibiotic resistance of pathogens.  Consequently, there are increasing incidences in which are no effective drugs available to treat infections.

In the Small World Initiative course students isolate, characterize and identify antibiotic producing bacteria from soil in the hopes of finding novel bacteria.  The majority of antibiotics available today were found in soil dwelling microbes.

Congratulations to Dr. Jacqueline Washington, Chair, and the Department of Natural Sciences for the work toward this distinguished honor.

For further information, please see http://cst.yale.edu/swi

Dr. Poston Reviews Book on Second Chinese Enlightenment

Posted by Fernando.Arzola on Monday July 7, 2014

Dr. Larry Poston, Professor of Religion, publishes review on “Theosis, Sino-Christian Theology and the Second Chinese Enlightenment: Heaven and Humanity in Unity” in Missiology: An International Review.

Continuing in the tradition of its predecessor, Practical Anthropology, Missiology is a forum for the exchange of ideas and research between missiologists and others interested in related subjects.

To read book review:

http://mis.sagepub.com/content/42/3/334.full.pdf+html

For more information on journal:

http://www.asmweb.org/content/missiology

Dr. Romaine Co-edits Art History Text

Posted by Fernando.Arzola on Monday July 7, 2014

Dr. James Romaine, Associate Professor of Art History, publishes ReVisioing: Critical Methods of Seeing Christianity in the History of Art (Cascade Books, 2014). This anthology of seventeen essays explores the applications of art historical methodologies to the history of Christianity and the visual arts. Over the last two decades, there has been a growing scholarly interest in the rich and diverse history of Christianity and the visual arts. ReVisioning provides strategies for a renewed seeing of this history.

Review

"Romaine and Stratford's collection raises the question of how methodologies of art history--formulated within the secular context of modern academe--have failed and succeeded at understanding the Christian content of works of art. The question becomes urgent when the artworks under examination are also from the modern period and thus suffer from the doubling of denial of Christian content, but the collection is also enriched by material from earlier periods of art.''
--Natasha Seaman, Rhode Island College

''ReVisioning delivers on the nuanced promise in its subtitle; it sustains intellectual sophistication while it revises, reconsiders, and reimagines the rich threads in the fabric of critical Christianity. The more than fifteen thoughtful essays venture courageously into the space within academe too often dismissed, suppressed, or maligned--that is to say, the space of the sacred. . . . Its essays, spanning the history of artistic production from the medieval to the moderns in a mix of fresh, critical perspectives, go a long way to restore the relevance of mystery, transcendence, and dare it be said, the sacred, to what I hope is an ongoing conversation on theological aesthetics. ReVisioning is a courageous and long-overdue stake in the ground.''
--Ronald R. Bernier, Wentworth Institute of Technology
 
For more information: 

https://wipfandstock.com/store/ReVisioning_Critical_Methods_of_Seeing_

Dr. Lux presents at American University in Paris

Posted by Fernando.Arzola on Monday July 7, 2014

Dr. Elaine Lux, Professor of English, presents paper, “Fiction and the Illness Narrative: Wrestling Meaning in, and through, Hugh Cook’s Heron River” at the Narrative Matters 2014 conference at the American University in Paris. This conference brings together scholars of all disciplines — psychology, psychoanalysis, sociology, anthropology, history, philosophy, linguistics, literary studies, feminist and gender studies, education, medicine/healthcare, social work, biology, law, theology, computer science, visual studies, etc. — to reflect on the issue of the, sometimes, contested epistemic powers of narrative

Abstract: Fiction and the illness narrative: wrestling meaning in, and through, Hugh Cook’s Heron River” focuses on Hugh Cook’s beautifully rendered novel Heron River and the wrestling for meaning within it, by characters, author, and readers. It concentrates primarily on two of Heron River’s characters: Madeline and her son Adam. Madeline, middle aged, now suffers from MS. She deals with her own debilitating illness; the dementia of her aged father, who lives in a nursing home; and the challenges faced by her twenty-six-year-old son Adam, who lives in a group home because of retardation he incurred when he fell into and became stuck in a well when he was about six years old.

The paper examines the way the stories of Madeline and Adam individually and together shift from chaos narrative to quest narrative, illness narrative genres identified by Arthur Frank in The Wounded Storyteller: Body, Illness, and Ethics. Frank’s work deals primarily with autobiographical, real life narratives, with the intent of helping to create a real-world opportunity for people to tell their illness stories. This paper applies key elements of Frank’s theoretical rubric to a specific work of fiction, Heron River, as it explores the “call [of illness] for stories” in fictional formats, too, with the intent of showing that fiction can make an important contribution to the genre of illness narrative. In its exploration of the wrestling for meaning by characters, author, and readers of Heron River, the paper examines, as well, how an illness narrative on a theme of intense multiple sufferings can provide emotional enjoyment and ethical value to the novel’s writer and readers, drawing upon Keith Oatley’s ideas about the association of the enjoyment of fiction with play and with the emotional rewards of friendship and Hugh Cook’s explanation of his impetus for writing.

For more information:

http://www.aup.edu/sites/default/files/document/pdf/NM2014_pre_program_v1.pdf


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